Tag Archives: young volunteers

Young People’s Skills Programme – by Young Freelancer Aksana Khan

London Transport Museum’s Young Freelancers are young people, aged
16 – 25, passionate about creative learning and museums. They work on a project by project basis supporting workshops and activities for different Museum audiences. They receive support and training whilst learning on the job, and also have the opportunity to complete an Arts Award qualification.

In this blog, Young Freelancer Aksana Khan talks about her first big project which involved supporting the Young People’s Skills Programme.

Image of the six young freelancers aboard a vintage bus in the museum.
Aksana (top left) and the other Young Freelancers

The aim of the Young People’s Skills Programme was to help a group of young volunteers to create an activity for the Skills Late 2018 event at the Museum. A Skills Late is a cross between a jobs fair and a museum late event. This year, we had a live DJ, an Apprentice Lounge, and stands from leading employers in the transport and technology industries such as Bombardier, Hitachi Rail Europe, Microsoft, Mott MacDonald, Siemens, telent, and Transport for London.

Employers’ stands at last year’s Skills Late

Our six talented, young volunteers had varied creative interests from animation and drawing, to story-telling and making maps. What united them was the desire to boost their own skills whilst helping other career seekers.

Lead Freelancer Becky Hatchett and I organised a Design Sprint Week for the volunteers, where they explored the Museum’s collection, attended sessions on presentation skills, and built their Arts Award portfolio.

Skanska graduates talking about their route into work

During this week, they met with members of our Learning Team, Skanska graduates, Hazel Grant (Recruitment Manager at TfL), and Seema Kaler (Transport Planner) who all provided valuable insight on different skills building.

The main focus of Design Sprint Week was for the volunteer to identify solutions to common questions young career seekers have, such as: what questions to ask employers; what different types of jobs exist in transport and infrastructure; how to find out about jobs that suit their interests and skills.

The volunteers divided themselves into groups and presented their solutions to our Learning Team in a ‘Dragon’s Den’ style – although much more jovial and relaxed!

Inspired by ‘Poster Girls’, the young volunteers designed their own posters based on their dream job in transport and infrastructure

The Learning Team were blown away by what the volunteers had come up with for the Skills Late event: a fun dress-up station where visitors could wear transport sector uniforms, and volunteers could dress up too while helping visitors navigate the employers’ stands throughout the Museum.

A 3D digital map with information portals on different careers, and a WhatsApp interface so that career seekers could ask people more about the jobs they are looking for. This solution inspired a career mapping activity, and a WhatsApp handout filled with questions to ask employers.

A highlight of the Skills Late event was how the young volunteers did a presentation on their activities in front of over 200 people!

London Transport Museum’s Young Volunteers

As a Young Freelancer, I learnt how museums can cater to young people who are eager to kick-start their careers. It was touching to be part of something where young people were listened to and had their views taken to account.

This programme exposed them to gatekeepers of various opportunities; it gave them an opportunity to gain an Arts Award, as well as tangible skills and experience for their own job hunt. It was great to see how the group became increasingly confident as the programme drew on.

Get in touch if you want to join us as a volunteer yourself!

Battle Bus Project 2016: Young Volunteers

During 2016 the Battle Bus community learning programme has worked with three amazing teams of young volunteers to co-curate an exhibition called From Tottenham to the trenches. These young volunteers consisted of a research team, an exhibition team and an outreach team who all had different roles to play in bringing together the exhibition.

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The project began in February with a group of 10 young research volunteers who were students recruited from universities across London. They were tasked with uncovering First World War stories linked to the events of 1916, the B-type bus, and Tottenham. Working alongside Rebecca Hatchett from S.I.D.E Projects, they met with museum professionals and First World War experts, delved into archives and went on field trips to piece together all the information needed to create content for the exhibition. You can read more about what they got up to on their blog here.

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This research was then passed on to eight Year 9 students at Northumberland Park Community School, who took on the role of exhibition volunteers. During weekly sessions with Rebecca and the Battle Bus Apprentice, Lamare, they creatively explored the research. They looked at why young men may have signed up to fight, the Battle of the Somme and the role that London buses played on the Western Front. Working with filmmaker Mmoloki Chrystie they used shadow puppets, drama and photography to produce images and a short creative film for the exhibition. You can watch their film here.

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The students also went on a bespoke three-day Battlefield tour to Belgium and France. They visited sites that had links to Tottenham and the buses, and learnt more about the Battle of the Somme and the Western Front.  The students paid their respects at the grave of William George Ely, a young soldier from Walthamstow whose story features in the exhibition. A film was made for the exhibition which documents their experience. You can watch it here.

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Then over the summer five young outreach volunteers worked alongside a spoken word artist, Mr Gee, to create original poems, responding to stories in the exhibition that they felt emotionally or personally attached to. Their work covered the ideas of home, memory, courage and conflict. As well as the poems featuring in the exhibition, they were also performed by the volunteers at exhibition launch events at London Transport Museum and Bruce Castle Museum.

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All the hard work and enthusiasm of the three teams of young volunteers culminated in the creation of the exhibition, From Tottenham to the trenches. It tells the story of London buses and the lives of young men from Tottenham who were affected by the First World War. It also marks the centenary of the Battle of the Somme. We invite you to visit the exhibition, which is on display at Bruce Castle Museum in Tottenham until Sunday 26 March 2017.

Many thanks to the Heritage Lottery Fund and London Transport Museum Friends for funding the Battle Bus Project. Also many thanks to Tottenham Grammar School Foundation and the Friends for funding the Battlefield Tour.

Young Volunteers – Induction Week

During the induction week young volunteers were given the opportunity to become familiar with the Museum. Over a period of four days the young people took part in a variety of different activities and met with different members of staff to help build up their knowledge of the Museum and better understand how it operates.

In particular they spent time developing their own map of the Museum, choosing significant objects from the collection to help navigate their way around each gallery. They had an opportunity to speak with Nadia Adira (Visitor Services Manager) and find out how the Museum runs from an operations perspective; as well as spend a day with Community Curator Michelle Brown, who delivered a creative activity that helped the young volunteers explore their own personal connections to the Museum’s collections.

Young Volunteers – Getting Started

On Saturday 2nd July the museum held an open day for young people aged 16-19 who were interested in joining our Journeys Youth Project.*

The day was a great success, bringing together a fabulous mix of young people from diverse communities, all with a variety of motivations for getting involved. Much fun was had throughout the day as the young people explored the museum, taking part in activities which challenged their perceptions of the museum as well as drew on their creativity and problem solving skills.

Whilst I head up the project from a logistical perspective, the actual delivery is led by one of our amazing freelance educators Sarita Mamseri, who in turn is being helped by our Peer Mentors.

Our Peer Mentors this year are Izara, Emira and Antoine. All three of whom were volunteers themselves during the last Journeys project in February. They have all been selected for their dedication, commitment and enthusiasm and each take responsibility for leading sessions and collaborating with Sarita to plan and resource workshops.

As previous participants, the role of Peer Mentor is to offer support and guidance to the volunteers by drawing on their past experiences. The role is also a great opportunity for these young people to develop their own skills further and to take on more and more responsibilities – boosting their CV’s!!

* Journeys is a youth volunteering scheme that aims to support young people to develop their skills in variety of areas, including project management and delivery of public events.

Agnes Poitevin-Navarre – Journeys 2012 Commission

It’s all about ‘mapping’ and ‘journeys’ at the moment, people. One of the artists working with the Museum to explore these themes is the wonderful Agnes Poitevin-Navarre.

Agnes has previously created a number of artworks based on French writer Marcel Proust’s personality questionnaire, devising a series of questions to ask members of the public. For example, ‘what is your greatest achievement’ and ‘what is the most important lesson life has taught you’. Answers were collected from people of all ages and walks of life, and plotted onto maps to highlight patterns of responses related to people’s achievements and pearls of wisdom.

Earlier this year Agnes met with the Museum’s Young Volunteers, working with them on ideas for a yet to be revealed new questionnaire. The results will shape Agnes’ creation of a new map of London that reflects Londoners’ individual paths on a pedestrian, geographical or poetic dimension.

This is where you come in. Want to have your journey mapped? I’ll soon be posting details of Agnes’ questionnaire and would love to hear from you! Once again, stay tuned…

        

Want to know more about Agnes’ work?

Originally from France, Agnes moved to England to study fine art, firstly in Canterbury to do a BA and then at the Slade School of Fine Art, in London, to complete her MA.

Agnes’ art work is concerned with notions of identity, challenging perceptions of cultural, linguistic and racial categorisation. Her art practice investigates the decoding of these issues in a plurality of media [maps, prints, hair embroidery pieces, indoors and outdoors site specific installations]. The Proustian series of maps is a marvellous platform for the artist to interact with the audience. By recording their responses, she is creating historical documents that reflect the many facets of a city and the richness of individuals experiences that breathe life into it.

To find out more go to http://www.agnespnavarre.com/