Tag Archives: young consultants

Exhibition Private View

On 17 May 2012 London Transport Museum ran a private viewing of the Mind the Map exhibition. We heard speeches from Sam Mullins (the director of the museum), Simon Patterson (creator of art works Great Bear and Saptarishi) and a spoken word piece performed by Kway, Elvis, Gloria and Izara (the museum’s Young Consultants). We got the chance to speak to people from the Geffrye museum and the Arts Council about the work we have been doing. We were also given the chance to talk to press about the exhibition and generally all the work the Young Consultants have been doing from 2009 onwards. This exhibition is currently running until 28 October 2012.

Waiting to go on stage was really nerve racking. We waited anxiously for Sam Mullins to finish introducing us, for us to then take our positions.  When preforming our pieces the feeling was indescribable, the pride filled us as the hundreds of people clapped when we finished our piece. It was most definitely an amazing opportunity, to get on stage and have our voices heard by hundreds of people.

“The involvement of ‘young consultants’, a group of teenagers whom the museum involved through all stages of the exhibition’s planning, is the icing on the cake.”Londonist

‘What is a Map’ – poster parade

The Museum’s current poster parade display was curated and installed by our amazing Young Consultants, with input from young people in both the UK and Spain.

The display coincides with the Museum’s ‘Mind the Map: inspiring art, design and cartography’ exhibition. ‘Mind the Map’ features an incredible variety of maps, from those that help you get from A to B through to decorative maps, maps as publicity along with some amazing contemporary artworks that explore notions of ‘personal mapping’ and ‘journeys’. The poster display invites you to consider what a map is and can be and explores the many creative approaches to mapping London, its transport system and passengers’ journeys.

This display features labels written by members of the public. We asked young people to give their personal response to the posters on display. Along with involvement from young people in London, we were also lucky enough to work with the wonderful students from the Colegio Cardenal Spinola school in Spain, whose teacher Antonio Cortés has been using the Museum’s collection as a tool to spark discussion during his English language classes.

Each label features a response that reflects a personal journey or experience, bringing very new and insightful perspectives to the Museum’s collection.

Here’s a sample from people’s amazing contributions:

‘This poster reminds me of those nights where the sky is black and the stars light up and you are with someone you love and tell him to count the stars and you love him as much as there are stars in the sky.’
– Eva López, age 15, Cardenal Spínola School, near Seville, Spain

‘This poster reminds me of my journey and paths I have taken toward a life in performance. The bright lights of the signs welcome you into this surreal world that you never want to leave!’
– Gloria Gaspard, age 20, student and LTM Young Consultant, Highams Park, London

A big thank you to everyone who took part!

Young Consultants – Reflections

Since November 2009 we have been working with an amazing group of young people, known to the Museum as the Young Consultants.


Kway


Elvis


Adelah


Godwin


Will

 

Over the last 18 months these five young people have helped to shape our policies and ways of working with young people across the Museum. They have been involved collectively and individually in innumerable projects, from developing tools for reinterpretation to interviewing freelance educators for our community art project Bus Shelters. They have represented the Museum at a regional and national level and are, in their own words, “the bridge between this museum and the young people of today … and tomorrow”.

Since May of this year the Young Consultants have been working on a strategy to take their involvement in the Museum to the next level. I have had the enormous pleasure of working alongside them, and together we have now outlined a series of aims and objectives that support both the skills development of the Young Consultants themselves, as well as working towards embedding more opportunities for other young people throughout the Museum.

Over the coming months the Young Consultants will be working on multiple projects which aim to;

  • Increase their ‘professional experience’ through networking events, running meetings and speaking at conferences.
  • Work with other museums and young people around London.
  • Work across the Museum’s departments, emphasising the indispensable role young people can play through their skills and creativity.
  • Become involved in core development projects for exhibitions such as Journeys in 2012 and LU150 in 2013.

World city walk update

I arrived at the Museum bright and early this morning to join the wonderful Vicky from Design and Kath from Displayways for the installation of new text panels and graphics in our World city walk gallery. It’s always exciting to see the outcomes of projects we’ve been working on go into the main galleries. I was particularly excited about this one as it has involved contribution from the public, the Museum’s Young Consultants, along with past project participants.

The World city walk enhancements are one part of our extensive Stories of the World programme. Earlier last year we ran a number of focus groups with members of the public to explore the programme’s development. As part of this we asked participants for feedback on the World city walk gallery. Our Young Consultants also reviewed the gallery and came up with a number of ideas for enhancements. In fact, this was one of the first curatorial projects that the Young Consultants were involved in so it’s great that they’ll get to see its completion.

In terms of feedback, people agreed that the gallery was visually impressive, but wanted further information about its key messages. The Young Consultants were keen to emphasise that some of the content going into the Museum’s galleries was developed in partnership with individuals and organisations from London and beyond.

So how did we do this? The World city walk gallery invites people to explore the similarities and differences in transport modes and usage across different world cities, whilst exploring the key message that ‘transport is the lifeblood of the city’. This statement is now one of the first things that visitors will see as they enter the gallery. Along with being printed in English, it has been translated into Japanese, French, Mandarin and Hindu to reflect the languages spoken in the world cities that feature in the galleries. The Museum is very keen to maintain links with people who’ve taken part in our projects and we asked some of our contacts to assist with the translations.

Along with an introductory text panel and prints of the city names that feature, we also have a text panel explaining that some of the content featured in the galleries was co-created with the Museum’s audiences. We’re looking forward to installing a number of outcomes from engagement projects over the next few months.