Tag Archives: tickets

A B-type Paper Trail

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Having already discovered a collection of fascinating newspaper fragments inside our B-type bus seat cushions, it was remarkable to find three tickets also tucked away.  Although we will probably never be completely sure, the tickets provide some useful clues as to the history of our bus.

The tickets are from a bus company named Road Motors of Weymouth, who were part of the Road Motors of Luton company operating in the early 1920s. Documents show that Road Motors bought a number of used buses from the London General Omnibus Company, including two B-type buses (B1616 and B2558). In addition, a number of their other vehicles had B-type bodies fitted including Dennis NM2146. The private company did not last long though, and was bought by the National Omnibus & Transport Company in April 1925.

It is feasible that the B-type bus body we are restoring was at one time used in Weymouth; or our seat cushion was switched between buses that once served the seaside town. Based on this circumstantial evidence, tracing the history of our cushions with any accuracy is extremely difficult. Despite all the guesswork, it is certain that Road Motors would from time to time, transfer buses between Luton and Weymouth and back again. This goes some way to explaining how a Weymouth bus ticket was found inside the cushion. The rest of the story remains a mystery.

Plenty More Room On Top

Our volunteers at the museum regularly put their shoulders to the wheel to help make sure that our visitors have a memorable experience. One of those experience s in ‘Object handling’ which is always popular – an opportunity to play with stuff, hands on. These sessions often have a bus theme, and on the day that I called in the guys were in full swing with fare tables, caps and various ticket machines.

For someone of – ahem – my vintage, it can come as a bit of shock to realise that bus conductors will be a distant memory for anyone under the age of ten, and probably unknown to those under eight. So it’s no longer safe to assume that our younger guests have any conception of why there were conductors and what they got up to. A significant part of the experience is therefore an initiation into the daily work of the ladies and gentlemen collecting fares on the RT, trolleybus or tram.

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I found volunteers Peter Brown, John Campbell and Joe Ross accepting this challenge. As you can see, our heroic trio were under various states of siege on the day, and not just from the younger patrons. The desire to handle a Gibson ticket machine obviously runs deep in the population at large, so it’s just as well that there were two to hand on the stall. I’m not ashamed to admit (well not much) that I had a go myself with one, and you’d be surprised by just how heavy they are.

Joe is the novice of the team, having some 3 months under his belt as a volunteer, but he was in safe hands with the experienced pair of John and Peter. Both have volunteered for a number of years, and been involved in many activities to support the work of the museum. Peter is also active with the London Bus Museum at Brooklands, so I think we can safely say that he has the bug badly.

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You can also see in the accompanying photos two trainee conductors I met, Uma and Niyam Shah – I think a couple of weeks at the Chiswick training school and they’ll be ready to apply to the Traffic Commissioners for their badges. I can’t help but think that Uma might have the edge on her brother if they find themselves on the 15. And hurry up, it’s my turn with the cap…….

Dave Olney, Volunteer

Accessioning Tickets

At the Museum Depot in Acton Dilwyn Rees and David Clark regularly accession ephemera into the Museum’s collection.  Their main focus is on tickets – from bus, rail and tram to trolleybus tickets, spanning the decades as far back as the early 1900’s.  Recently we caught up with them to find out what they were working on:

“Just thought our readers would like to know that we have recently selected in route number order, Gibson long and short tickets for Central bus including Trolleybus and Country bus that Graham Page (volunteer sadly passed away in 2010) had put away for safe keeping.  Where there is more than one route number we select the best copy, finishing up with two bundles – one for accessioning which includes checking for size and then mounting in plastic sleeves, and duplicates which are for disposal to the LTM Friends stall.  We did find an example which was issued from a special batch of Gibson held at Epping Garage which had provision of the issue of return tickets and inclusion of date.  We are still in the process of selecting Bell Punch tickets between 1949-1951, which is on-going at present.”

David Clark (volunteer)

Christmas travel tickets – Mind the Map Artwork

We’re still busy working on some great new content for next year’s exhibition, ‘Mind the Map‘.

I recently put a call out for used transport tickets that may be used by artist Susan Stockwell to create a large-scale world map. Contributions have been pouring in – thank you! – and we’ve received a huge range of tickets from both the UK and from overseas.

But of course we’re always on the lookout for more! Along with UK tickets we’re really keen to receive travel tickets you may have from cities featured in the Museum’s World City Walk gallery – New Delhi, Shanghai, Tokyo, New York and Paris. But don’t let that limit you – we’re keen to include tickets from all over.

A definite highlight so far was a collection of old London bus tickets from the mid-1900s that were slipped, along with letters and other treasures, through the floorboards of a house by three young children, only to be discovered by subsequent residents years later.

Susan has been busy sorting the tickets and is finalising the design of the artwork, but is eagerly awaiting further contributions before she commits to sticking them down.

If you’re planning any trips over Christmas then we’d love to receive any travel tickets from your journeys. Once again, you can post your tickets and stories to:
Michelle Brown
London Transport museum
39 Wellington St
London
WC2E 7BB

   

 

Susan Stockwell – Mind the Map Artist

I recently posted about London Transport Museum’s mapping project with artist Susan Stockwell. I’ve been receiving lots of ticket donations – thank you! We’re still keen to collect as many transport tickets as possible and Susan has put in a special request for international transport tickets, so do get in touch should you like to contribute.

Here’s a bit more information about Susan’s work:

Susan Stockwell’s work takes many forms from small elaborate studies to large scale installations, sculpture, drawings and collage. It is concerned with issues of ecology, geo-politics, mapping, trade and global commerce. The materials used are the everyday, domestic and industrial disposable products that pervade our lives. These materials are manipulated and transformed into works of art that are extraordinary.

Stockwell gained an MA in sculpture from the Royal College of Art, London in 1992. Since then she has exhibited in galleries and museums all over the world including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the National Museum of China in Beijing,Katonah Museum of Art in America and soon London Transport Museum. She has been awarded scholarships, grants and commissions such as a Visiting Arts Taiwan-England Artists Fellowship, an Arts and Humanities Research Council Grant and has recently completed a large public commission World for the University of Bedfordshire. She has taught extensively and taken part in residencies and projects in Europe, America, Australia and Asia. She is based in London, England.

You can find out more about Susan’s work by visiting her website at: http://www.susanstockwell.co.uk

Susan Stockwell’s recent work (detail), a map of the world made from used computer parts. Commissioned by Luton University, 2010

 

Tickets, please!

Do you have a stash of old tickets at home? Would you like to contribute to an amazing new artwork that will become part of a major exhibition?

 

London Transport Museum is working on an exciting new project with artist Susan Stockwell, who has been commissioned to create a map for next year’s exhibition, Mind the Map: inspiring art, design and cartography.

Susan’s artworks often feature recycled materials, from computer parts through to used money, which are transformed into beautiful works of art. On this occasion Susan’s work will be made entirely of used transport tickets.

The artwork will explore the role of tickets not only as a ‘travel enabler’, but as a memory or symbolic representation of a journey. Tickets serve as a souvenir of people’s personal journeys; a memento from a particular point in time, filled with emotions and memories.

Have some transport tickets you’ve been saving? We’re busy collecting as many used transport tickets and associated memories as we can, which may be used in Susan’s artwork.  They can be any transport mode and from any country – winning prize for most unusual ticket so far goes to our Young Consultant, Elvis, and his elephant ride ticket from India. We’d also love to hear any stories or memories you might have related to your donation.

Should you like to contribute, please send your ticket(s), along with a paragraph of associated memories, to:
Michelle Brown
39 Wellington Street
London
WC2E 7BB
email: michelle.brown@ltmuseum.co.uk

If you don’t have any tickets, but would still like to contribute, comment or email us your favourite transport journey – from the regular and mundane to the weird and wonderful, we’d love to hear from you!

       

 

Volunteers on Hand to Support the Depot Open Weekend

On the 8-9th October London Transport Museum opened its doors to the public at its Museum Depot in Acton.  Each year the Museum opens its collection up to the public for two weekends in March and October.  Each weekend is themed, and this time the focus was on highlighting our Engineering collection.  As part of the theme talks, tours, film screenings, rides on the miniature railway, as well as demonstrations by TfL’s Emergency Response Unit, were all offered to the public.

Throughout the weekend we had over 30 volunteers on hand to support the event.  Some were able to put their specialist knowledge to good use by giving talks to visitors on specific engineering objects such as the Manor House sub-station control panel from Wood Green control room. The miniature railway team is made up completely of volunteers, who manage and maintain and the railway throughout the year in preparation for large events such as this.  Over the two days over 800 rides were offered to visitors, which definately kept the team on their feet!

Volunteers were also on hand to educate visitors in learning about some of London Transport Museum’s handling collection.  The theme Tickets Please!’ is a regular feature at Open Weekends and provides visitors with the chance to engage with knowledegable volunteers, as well as handle some of the museums ticketing items and learn about life on the buses.  Across the two days volunteers engaged with a whopping 500 visitors, which just proves how popular the theme is and how valuable working knowledge from our volunteers can be in educating visitors.