Tag Archives: Journeys

London Commuters – WE NEED YOU!

In one week from today you’ll get the chance to contribute to a major artwork that will be displayed in our upcoming Mind the Map exhibition, 18th May to 28th October.

The artist Agnès Poitevin-Navarre is working with us to create a new map of London based on Londoners’ responses to a mystery question that will only be revealed next Wednesday 8th February in the Metro newspaper and on the Museum’s website. We’ll be collecting responses from Wednesday 8th February until Friday 10th February so watch this space! If you’d like to be one of the first to receive the questionnaire then register your interest by contacting michelle.brown@ltmuseum.co.uk.

Agnès Poitevin-Navarre

You can read more about Agnes and her work at http://www.agnespnavarre.com

Jeremy Wood – Mind the Map artist

Next in our exciting line-up of mapping projects is a commission with artist/cartographer Jeremy Wood. Jeremy uses GPS drawing to digitally trace his daily movements and journeys, creating beautifully expressive works of art.

The Museum already has one of Jeremy’s works in its collection – My Ghost – in which his journeys throughout London from 2008-2009 are tracked to reveal a personal cartography. The Museum’s commission will result in a new GPS map of London, to be displayed for the first time in our Mind the Map exhibition.

When I met with Jeremy earlier this year he was busy cycling the length of the Thames, mapping his route along the way in order to create the foundations for his new artwork.

We won’t be revealing the final artwork until next year’s exhibition, however look out for further posts as the work progresses.

You can find out more about Jeremy and his work at: www.jeremywood.net

My Ghost, by Jeremy Wood, 2009

Claire Brewster – Mind the Map’s first completed commission

We now have our first completed Mind the Map artwork! London Transport Museum is commissioning a series of new artworks for the exhibition, including the Lost & Found project where by an artwork is created from lost or found transport maps and explores the theme of ‘journeys’.

Paper artist Claire Brewster visited London Transport Museum to search through our large collection of discarded maps, including some sourced from TfL’s lost property office, from which to create her artwork. Claire selected a series of maps from 1987, the year that she moved to London and significant to her own personal journey. You can find out more about Claire’s work at her website: http://www.clairebrewster.co.uk

I recently visited Claire at her studio to interview her about the commission. You’ll have to wait for next year’s exhibition to see the final artwork but for now you can get a behind the scenes look at its making, including details from Claire on her approach and influences:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyjwZV_jN2k

Pocket Underground map from 1987, the year that Claire moved to London

 

Thoughts and Feelings about Consultancy – by Godwin Asante, Young Consultant

Reflecting on Consultancy

Being a Young Consultant at London Transport Museum is a great way to gain new skills in a working environment. Since April 2011 I’ve been a part of the Young Consultants at LTM, and already I feel like I’ve gained a wide range of skills.

One of the projects I did as a Young Consultant was at Coram’s Fields Youth Centre, where I was able to speak to other young people about work experience. This was to help them understand that there are different ways to gain as well as improve their skills. It was a great way to share a personal testimony on the skills I’ve gained, and how I became a Young Consultant at LTM.

As I am about to leave LTM and move on to study at Coventry University, I want to take this opportunity to let other young people know that the journey they take will not be easy but when they look back at what they have achieved, they can be proud of themselves. If there is an opportunity grab it, because you’ll never know when the next one will come.

Thoughts and Feelings about Consultancy – by Adelah Bilal, Young Consultant

Nearly two years after first starting the Young Consultant project we have witnessed so many changes in the museum and with ourselves. Being a Young Consultant has been more than just a job, it has also been a sea of wider opportunities, learning experiences and the beginning of many friendships.

Never has the phrase ‘the world is your oyster’ been more applicable than at London Transport Museum. I believe this because of three main things I have learnt during this experience.

Firstly, I have a greater understanding of what my strongest skills are. By working on a variety of projects, such as giving presentations, facilitating focus groups and interviewing artists, I have had to rely on my communication skills and in particular public speaking. This skill will greatly support my future career aim of becoming a barrister, which I have also been supported in pursuing by the staff here at LTM. The same can be said for the other YCs. We all have many different aspirations, and by having CPD and project evaluation meetings with the vivacious Vicki Pipe and spectacular Steve Gardam we have been supported and encouraged to achieve our goals.

Secondly, this project has allowed me to see first hand the positive contributions that young people can make to society. Although young people often receive negative press, especially in light of the recent UK riots and looting, we feel that it is necessary to emphasise that there are many young people making positive contributions to their communities. For example, the Young Volunteers at LTM who deliver family activities for visitors or even the large number of young people involved in national Stories of the World projects. I feel privileged to be a part of this group of young people and I look forward to a continuous legacy of youth participation.

Young Volunteers – Induction Week

During the induction week young volunteers were given the opportunity to become familiar with the Museum. Over a period of four days the young people took part in a variety of different activities and met with different members of staff to help build up their knowledge of the Museum and better understand how it operates.

In particular they spent time developing their own map of the Museum, choosing significant objects from the collection to help navigate their way around each gallery. They had an opportunity to speak with Nadia Adira (Visitor Services Manager) and find out how the Museum runs from an operations perspective; as well as spend a day with Community Curator Michelle Brown, who delivered a creative activity that helped the young volunteers explore their own personal connections to the Museum’s collections.

Young Consultants – Reflections

Since November 2009 we have been working with an amazing group of young people, known to the Museum as the Young Consultants.


Kway


Elvis


Adelah


Godwin


Will

 

Over the last 18 months these five young people have helped to shape our policies and ways of working with young people across the Museum. They have been involved collectively and individually in innumerable projects, from developing tools for reinterpretation to interviewing freelance educators for our community art project Bus Shelters. They have represented the Museum at a regional and national level and are, in their own words, “the bridge between this museum and the young people of today … and tomorrow”.

Since May of this year the Young Consultants have been working on a strategy to take their involvement in the Museum to the next level. I have had the enormous pleasure of working alongside them, and together we have now outlined a series of aims and objectives that support both the skills development of the Young Consultants themselves, as well as working towards embedding more opportunities for other young people throughout the Museum.

Over the coming months the Young Consultants will be working on multiple projects which aim to;

  • Increase their ‘professional experience’ through networking events, running meetings and speaking at conferences.
  • Work with other museums and young people around London.
  • Work across the Museum’s departments, emphasising the indispensable role young people can play through their skills and creativity.
  • Become involved in core development projects for exhibitions such as Journeys in 2012 and LU150 in 2013.

Young Volunteers – Planning Session 1

Saturday 23rd July was the first official planning session for the young volunteers. The aim over the next 5 weekends is for the young people to plan a series of family activities for visitors, which will be delivered during the final week of the summer holidays (29th August-2nd September). The theme for the activities, as with the rest of the holiday workshops, is tied in with the Museum’s temporary exhibition Sense in the City: smart, connected and on the move. Their work will bring them into further contact with members of the Museum’s learning team, particularly our Family Learning Officer, Steve Moorhouse. Preparations are under way and we will keep posting things up as events unfold!

World city walk update

I arrived at the Museum bright and early this morning to join the wonderful Vicky from Design and Kath from Displayways for the installation of new text panels and graphics in our World city walk gallery. It’s always exciting to see the outcomes of projects we’ve been working on go into the main galleries. I was particularly excited about this one as it has involved contribution from the public, the Museum’s Young Consultants, along with past project participants.

The World city walk enhancements are one part of our extensive Stories of the World programme. Earlier last year we ran a number of focus groups with members of the public to explore the programme’s development. As part of this we asked participants for feedback on the World city walk gallery. Our Young Consultants also reviewed the gallery and came up with a number of ideas for enhancements. In fact, this was one of the first curatorial projects that the Young Consultants were involved in so it’s great that they’ll get to see its completion.

In terms of feedback, people agreed that the gallery was visually impressive, but wanted further information about its key messages. The Young Consultants were keen to emphasise that some of the content going into the Museum’s galleries was developed in partnership with individuals and organisations from London and beyond.

So how did we do this? The World city walk gallery invites people to explore the similarities and differences in transport modes and usage across different world cities, whilst exploring the key message that ‘transport is the lifeblood of the city’. This statement is now one of the first things that visitors will see as they enter the gallery. Along with being printed in English, it has been translated into Japanese, French, Mandarin and Hindu to reflect the languages spoken in the world cities that feature in the galleries. The Museum is very keen to maintain links with people who’ve taken part in our projects and we asked some of our contacts to assist with the translations.

Along with an introductory text panel and prints of the city names that feature, we also have a text panel explaining that some of the content featured in the galleries was co-created with the Museum’s audiences. We’re looking forward to installing a number of outcomes from engagement projects over the next few months.

                

      

  

Agnes Poitevin-Navarre – Journeys 2012 Commission

It’s all about ‘mapping’ and ‘journeys’ at the moment, people. One of the artists working with the Museum to explore these themes is the wonderful Agnes Poitevin-Navarre.

Agnes has previously created a number of artworks based on French writer Marcel Proust’s personality questionnaire, devising a series of questions to ask members of the public. For example, ‘what is your greatest achievement’ and ‘what is the most important lesson life has taught you’. Answers were collected from people of all ages and walks of life, and plotted onto maps to highlight patterns of responses related to people’s achievements and pearls of wisdom.

Earlier this year Agnes met with the Museum’s Young Volunteers, working with them on ideas for a yet to be revealed new questionnaire. The results will shape Agnes’ creation of a new map of London that reflects Londoners’ individual paths on a pedestrian, geographical or poetic dimension.

This is where you come in. Want to have your journey mapped? I’ll soon be posting details of Agnes’ questionnaire and would love to hear from you! Once again, stay tuned…

        

Want to know more about Agnes’ work?

Originally from France, Agnes moved to England to study fine art, firstly in Canterbury to do a BA and then at the Slade School of Fine Art, in London, to complete her MA.

Agnes’ art work is concerned with notions of identity, challenging perceptions of cultural, linguistic and racial categorisation. Her art practice investigates the decoding of these issues in a plurality of media [maps, prints, hair embroidery pieces, indoors and outdoors site specific installations]. The Proustian series of maps is a marvellous platform for the artist to interact with the audience. By recording their responses, she is creating historical documents that reflect the many facets of a city and the richness of individuals experiences that breathe life into it.

To find out more go to http://www.agnespnavarre.com/