Tag Archives: art

Tickets, please!

Do you have a stash of old tickets at home? Would you like to contribute to an amazing new artwork that will become part of a major exhibition?

 

London Transport Museum is working on an exciting new project with artist Susan Stockwell, who has been commissioned to create a map for next year’s exhibition, Mind the Map: inspiring art, design and cartography.

Susan’s artworks often feature recycled materials, from computer parts through to used money, which are transformed into beautiful works of art. On this occasion Susan’s work will be made entirely of used transport tickets.

The artwork will explore the role of tickets not only as a ‘travel enabler’, but as a memory or symbolic representation of a journey. Tickets serve as a souvenir of people’s personal journeys; a memento from a particular point in time, filled with emotions and memories.

Have some transport tickets you’ve been saving? We’re busy collecting as many used transport tickets and associated memories as we can, which may be used in Susan’s artwork.  They can be any transport mode and from any country – winning prize for most unusual ticket so far goes to our Young Consultant, Elvis, and his elephant ride ticket from India. We’d also love to hear any stories or memories you might have related to your donation.

Should you like to contribute, please send your ticket(s), along with a paragraph of associated memories, to:
Michelle Brown
39 Wellington Street
London
WC2E 7BB
email: michelle.brown@ltmuseum.co.uk

If you don’t have any tickets, but would still like to contribute, comment or email us your favourite transport journey – from the regular and mundane to the weird and wonderful, we’d love to hear from you!

       

 

Mind the Map: inspiring art, design and cartography

After much discussion and debate we now have a new title for our Journeys 2012 exhibition! Mind the Map: inspiring art, design and cartography will draw on the Museum’s outstanding map collection to explore the theme of journeys. We’ll be including an incredible range of maps, from diagrammatic and decorative through to digital.
The exhibition will be the largest of its kind – you’ll get to see previously unseen historic material and some fantastic newly commissioned works of art.
We’re also inviting our audiences to participate, both before and during the exhibition, in our exploration of what a map is, can and should be. The art commissions I’ve mentioned in previous blogs, including projects by Stephen Walter, Susan Stockwell and Agnes Poitevin-Navarre are examples of this.
Simon Patterson, The Great Bear (detail), 1992

New Artist Commissions – Journeys 2012

In one year from today London Transport Museum will open a major exhibition for 2012 that will draw on our outstanding historic map collection, exploring the theme of Journeys. Along with historic maps we’ll be displaying some fantastic newly commissioned artworks by artists such as Stephen Walter, Simon Patterson, Susan Stockwell, Jeremy Wood and Agnes Poitevin-Navarre, with more to artists to be confirmed. 

Want to be involved? A number of these projects will be shaped using public content, meaning that you’ll be able to contribute directly to the artworks. Stephen Walter, for example, is currently asking for your comments for his Subterranean Map of London.

There are some seriously exciting projects underway and we’ll be posting regularly on their development. Stay tuned…

Stephen Walter – Maps and Landscapes


Hub, 2007-2010, © Stephen Walter


Hub (detail), 2007-2010, © Stephen Walter

Stephen Walter’s maps and landscapes set out to challenge our first impressions, exploring ideas about beauty and desire within the politics of space, and the micro- and macrocosms in which we live. Under the guise of traditional techniques, his work reveals a myriad of words and symbols. The fantastical additions, references to history, trivia, personal experiences and local knowledge merge older notions of Romanticism with a fascination in the intricacies and the contradictions of our modern world.