Category Archives: Communities

#MyJourneyToPride – Here’s what happened!

By Ellie Miles, Documentary Curator

Back in July we partnered up with museum freelancer Sacha Coward and invited people to use the #MyJourneyToPride hashtag to document and share their stories of travelling to Pride in London and UK Black Pride on social media. We also asked some people to record video diaries of their journeys in order to create a picture of the lived experience of a group of people from the LGBT+ community in London in 2019.

This film is a glimpse into the experiences our diarists had over the weekend. How did they feel about their journeys? Did they feel safe travelling to the events? Did they ‘de-rainbow’ for the journey home?

When we asked people to record their stories we sought a full picture, not just the positive, and were thankful to be entrusted with accounts than included good and bad. Alongside the moments of celebration and connection there are incidents of abuse and examples of people feeling unsafe or uncomfortable. One of the clips towards the end of the film shows how walking home alone in the dark can feel unsafe. It’s all part of the story that we wanted to record.

We didn’t know whether trying to collect these stories via a hashtag would work, but we were pleased to see that over the weekend the hashtag was pretty active, being shared around 500 times. We’re now in the process of approaching people to ask permission for rights to preserve their content within the Museum’s collection.

These stories will enrich our collection and give these experiences a place in the history of transport in London. They will sit alongside physical objects that we collected in recent years which you can learn about on our website, including posters, badges, oyster wallets and the first rainbow crossing. We hope to preserve the poster series that TfL installed at Green Park station as well. We will continue to work to build our LGBT+ collections in the future, and hope to do more to learn about the history of LGBT+ communities and their transport experiences.

We want to thank everyone who supported this collecting project. We are very grateful to be entrusted with caring for these stories, objects and experiences. We are currently working on ways to display and interpret this material in the Museum itself, and we’ll be sure to keep you updated!

If you shared material but have not heard from us yet or if you have material from Pride weekend which you haven’t shared yet but would like to tell us about, please get in touch by emailing documentarycurator@ltmuseum.co.uk.

#MyJourneyToPride – Collecting LGBT+ experiences

By Ellie Miles, Documentary Curator

London’s transport brings people together, especially for major events like the Pride weekend, which this year is taking place on 6-7 July. As part of a new collecting project, we are looking for people to document their journeys to Pride in London and UK Black Pride 2019. We are inviting video diarists to record their feelings and thoughts throughout their journeys, and we are also encouraging people to take part in the project by sharing their photos and videos on social media using the hashtag #MyJourneyToPride and by tagging @ltmuseum in the videos, photos and text that you want to share.

Ride with Pride vehicles, 2015

If you’re making your way to Pride or UK Black Pride then let us know what is exciting about your journey. How does the atmosphere change as you get closer to the events? Are you seeing more people heading the same way as you? What does it mean to see more flags and rainbows and banners in London? We want to record the social side of the story that objects don’t convey by themselves.

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Rainbow crossing, 2015 

The stories that you record and that we collect will help enrich some of the material we already have in our collection like banners, posters and the first ever rainbow crossing. A great deal of material we have in the Museum that represents the LGBT+ experience is focused on the stories of members of staff, and we would like to invite passengers, pedestrians and participants to make their lived experience a part of the history of transport in London too. The experiences of non-binary and transgender people are under-represented in the Museum’s collection at the moment and we would particularly welcome material that is more inclusive of all genders.

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Ride with Pride poster, 2015

This year it is as important as ever to take to the streets to take a positive stance against violence and discrimination targeted at the LGBT+ community. London Transport Museum will offer space to preserve and record the thoughts, feelings and experiences of people travelling to Pride in London in 2019.

Please consider a few things if you are keen to take part in the project by tagging content for the Museum to see:

  • Crowd shots and groups are fine to film or photograph with verbal consent, but please don’t film or photograph individuals close-up. This especially applies to young people and children
  • Please don’t share and tag footage that might enable people to locate your home
  • Stay safe, please don’t put yourself in danger and only film/photograph when you feel comfortable

Travel safe, have fun and be proud! 🌈

Social Stations – A contemporary collecting project

By Susanna Cordner, Documentary Curator

When I first told friends that my new job at London Transport Museum would involve seeking out social stories about transport, a common response was to ask, Can you find out who keeps the plants at Kew Gardens station so neat? Or Who writes the ‘Thought of the Day’ board at Oval? and other questions along those lines.

I could see there was a strand here: a set of social stories based on the individuals or groups who, through projects and interventions great and small, are making the most of spaces at stations, and making an impact on the staff and passengers who pass through.

A lot of the narrative around transport tends to focus on the means, modes and methods of travel. Before any discussion on what form of transport you use and where it allows you to go, comes a place, a stop or a station. These stops and stations act as both defining pillars of the local area and gateways to a wider world. This makes them a particular breed of public or community space, ripe with opportunities to engage and relate to local need.

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Customer Services Assistant Glen Sutherland with a poster ‘Thought of the day’ at Oval station, 2012. Photo by Stephen Berry from London Transport Museum’s collection. Ref. 2012/56080

I set up our Social Stations Documentary Curator collecting project to celebrate the ways in which these community and grassroots projects are reclaiming, or re-calibrating, spaces at stations for public and/or environmental benefit. Whether simply boosting the mood of passers-by or actually contributing to the local economy and culture, these projects link local people to a local need, and make the most of previously underestimated public spaces which are experienced every day. They can also contribute to your sense of space and community even when you’re en-route.

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Energy Garden’s community gardening at Overground stations
Some of the most exciting moments as a curator come when you can give a new understanding to an object in a collection, and in so doing use it to tell a different story. Through contemporary collecting, you have the opportunity not just to help shape how the present will be remembered once it becomes the past, but also to make people reassess the world around them now. As a result, contemporary collecting involves a lot of conversations, consultation and observation. This means that some of the sources contemporary curators use to gauge a subject and its significance are a little more informal, and perhaps more social, than you’d expect.

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Mural by Aliza Nisenbaum depicting Victoria line staff at Brixton station

For this project I’ve spent a lot of time on messaging boards and social media feeds hunting out the truly local projects that don’t get the credit they deserve on wider platforms. I found the majority of examples we’ve explored because someone had shared a post or comment saying the difference a detail like this makes to their day.

We look forward to sharing some highlights from this collecting project with you soon, and invite you to get in touch with us if you know of a local project you think we should capture, by emailing us at documentarycurator@ltmuseum.co.uk.

Does transport shape our experiences?

Transport doesn’t just take people from A to B, it connects us and allows disparate parts of our city, and of our lives, to link. 

Our project, LGBT+ Linking Lives, aims at collecting stories about how transport connects LGBT+ lives and communities across our Capital. We want to hear about the journeys, sites and stories in which transport has played a role in people’s experience in London.

In this blog Andy De Santis – Vice Chair of OUTbound , TfL’s LGBT+ Staff Network – shares with us how London transport has shaped his relationships and experiences. 

Who doesn’t LOVE TfL designs?!

Even before working in transport, I could already understand its importance to the LGBT+ community. When I arrived in London, I initially met a varied group of friends on LGBT+ websites. We were an odd mix of people, from quiet guys in suits to the leotard-wearing nonchalant extrovert. We’d meet up at different venues every weekend – a welcoming break from our exhausting work life. This was our opportunity to be ourselves, free of shame or judgement as we got inside the Tube laughing and enjoying being together.

I don’t drive but I like to pretend I do!

Do you remember what it was like before the Night Tube? After a night out, everyone would drag themselves along to the bus stop to catch their night bus, like tired zombies in the night – ruined make up, dirty clothes, sometimes the stench accompanying someone who had partied too hard!

But the night bus was a place of freedom. Sexuality, race, gender, nothing mattered. Do you remember the big groups? They’d usually be the loudest ones, screaming as if to tell you they’d had such an awesome time. I also remember when they’d start singing – on a couple of occasions others on the bus would sing with them. This bizarre sing-a-long is perhaps what I miss the most from that time. Although I was a bit shy at the time, just hearing everyone around me singing was mesmerising. People united in song, all declaring how they had a good time.

Me and Judith, a very visible and proud bisexual, showcasing our rainbow lanyard.

Oh, the good times… all the connections, and that’s what transport does, isn’t it? It connects communities and people. I volunteer with a service helping LGBT+ people struggling with addiction and some come from outside the city, as support isn’t available in small towns. I could tell you many stories about me, but I’ll skip the “when I got the bus/train/tram”. Most of my experiences wouldn’t have happened without public transport. Transport connects us to people we care about. Isn’t it funny how we take that for granted?

Write to  documentarycurator@ltmuseum.co.uk if you would like to tell us your story about the role of transport in your LGBT+ life and experiences in London.  Visit our website to learn more about the LGBT+ Linking Lives project.

LGBT+ Linking Lives collecting project

London Transport Museum’s Documentary Curators, Susanna Cordner and Ellie Miles, collate and collect perspectives on and stories about the role transport plays in contemporary London. Their work gives us the opportunity to bring new voices into our collection and to make sure that the history and narratives we tell reflect the experiences of different kinds of people.

In this blog, Susanna reveals what attracted her to this role, and introduces her latest collecting project, LGBT+ Linking Lives.

What first drew me to the role of Documentary Curator was the opportunity to seek out and share different kinds of social stories. Transport seemed a particularly potent subject through which to do it. Public transport acts as a great unifier of public experience. If you dare to look around you, next time you’re sat on the Tube (I grant you, this isn’t common practice, but it might be worth the risk), more likely than not you’ll find yourself framed by a diverse range of people, with a greater mix of ages, ethnicities, and orientations than the majority of other work places or public spaces can offer.

Public transport is therefore a social space, a social subject, and, simultaneously, the performer of an essential social role. Transport doesn’t just take people from A to B, it connects us – it allows disparate parts of our city, and of our lives, to link.

TfL Ride with Pride vehicles, painted in rainbow colours in support of LGBT+ staff network, OUTbound. Photo by Eleanor Bentall

We took inspiration from this for our current LGBT+ Linking Lives collecting project, through which we are collecting stories about how transport connects LGBT+ lives and communities across our Capital. We want to hear about the journeys, sites and stories in which transport has played a role in your LGBT+ experience in London.

Andy De Santis, Vice Chair of OUTbound, TfL’s LGBT+ Staff Network

I’ve been collaborating with colleagues from OUTbound, TfL’s LGBT+ Staff Network Group, who have been so generous about sharing their stories so far. The subjects of these stories range from experiencing public transport as spaces of safety while transitioning, to the accepting community and revelry of the night bus, from feeling heartbroken heading home on the Tube to finding joy in staffing a station during Pride.

We will be sharing these stories over the coming weeks, and they will be the subject of a pop-up display at our upcoming Friday Late: London Stories on Friday 8 February.

Friday Late and Poster Prize for Illustration: London Stories promotional image by Julia Allum

At the event, you will also be able to add your own love stories to a giant map of meeting places. In case you want to record your own piece of past or present there and then, we will also be hosting a pop-up oral history booth on the night.

The everyday can often tell us more about the human experience than the exceptional, and the role and impact of something as arguably humble but essential as transport on our lives deserves to be remembered. I look forward to hearing your stories!

Learn more about our Friday Late: London Stories event on 8 February, and book here.

School Early Explorer Mornings at London Transport Museum

London Transport Museum is always at its quietest before a School’s Early Explorer Morning. There are no visitors yet and all the sounds in the galleries are turned off. Even late in the evening, long after the Museum closes, you can still hear the occasional audio narration echoing from a distant part of the galleries. But just before an Early Explorer Morning, all those sounds are silenced, and with good reason.

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Sounds off on the Elizabeth Line simulator in our new Future Engineers gallery

Our School’s Early Explorer Mornings have been running since 2014 and, three times a year, they provide us with an opportunity to welcome students with a broad range of Special Educational Needs (SEN), including Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), physical, emotional and behavioural needs.

For many SEN students high levels of noise, big groups of people and unfamiliar places can be stressful, uncomfortable and unmanageable. This can make many everyday situations difficult to deal with, and a visit to a museum as busy and noisy as the London Transport Museum is practically impossible. By turning off the sounds across the Museum, restricting the number of groups who come and keeping the Museum closed for an extra hour to allow exclusive access for our SEN students, we can combat some potential barriers to visiting.

Our latest School’s Early Explorer Morning took place on Friday 16 November. For some of the children visiting as part of school groups, it was an opportunity that remains a rare one; one visiting teacher told us the highlight of the trip was that for her learners, we were “giving them opportunities that otherwise [they] wouldn’t have – including driving/sitting on trains and buses”.

A pupil pointing in the All Aboard play zone
Learning through play in our All Aboard play zone

As well as offering a quiet introduction to the Museum, we also provided a number of additional flexible and sensory experiences, designed to cater for a range of learning needs and abilities. Explorers were able to explore our All Aboard play zone, meet historic characters, get close to our collection with our object handling team, climb aboard our vehicles and make use of our self-guided sensory explorer bags.

These multi-sensory bags are filled with objects and resources that enable learners to make deeper connections to our collection. They focus on four key vehicles in the Museum galleries and contain a range of objects for learners to interact with, including sounds, smells, images, props and interactive objects. These were developed in consultation with SEN teachers, pupils and sensory story specialist Jo Grace, as part of our commitment to supporting teachers’ needs across our School’s programmes. They are, according to a visiting speech and language specialist, “like having a little bit of school in a bag”, and “the best such bags she had ever seen.”

Children exploring a heritage train in the Museum
Exclusive access to our collection of heritage vehicles

On a School’s Early Explorer Morning, the Museum stays at its quietest for a while after opening. As the school groups drift in one by one though, the noise rises – although not to the same pitch as when the Museum is at its busiest – with the excitement of children having the entire Museum to themselves when they may not have the opportunity to visit such places at all.

On the 16 November, many of the school groups decided to stay in the Museum after the noises were switched back on, and the Museum opened up to the public and visitors started filtering in. Having become comfortable in the Museum environment, many of the students found that they were more relaxed and more able to be themselves in an occasionally chaotic environment.

A pupil on the top deck of a tram in the Museum
Independent exploration during exclusive access to the Museum

As the visiting teacher said: “thank you for the amazing day on Friday. Our pupils loved it so much and had a day they will always remember.”

The Museum aims to ensure all visitors to have an enjoyable and meaningful learning experience. We are committed to making London Transport Museum as accessible as possible for all children, including those with physical and learning difficulties. And happily, on those quiet mornings when we open only for our Early Explorers, we can.

Our next School’s Early Explorer morning is on Friday 29 March 2019.

The Museum’s Family Programme also delivers Early Explorer Mornings for family visitors. The next one coming up is on Saturday 15 December 2018 from 8.30 until 10.00. In 2019 an Early Explorer Morning or Explorer Evening for families will run every school holiday – dates coming soon.

If you would like more information about the School’s and Family’s Early Explorer mornings and other events, please do get in touch with us on learningmailbox@ltmuseum.co.uk.

Tube Station Artist’s First Show Held At Busworks

Last year Caledonian Road station customer services assistant Kim Kalan brightened up the ticket hall at the station with her intricate whiteboard drawings, often with accompanying messages and thoughtful poems. Now the self-taught artist, who has switched from using marker pens to acrylics, is staging her very first solo exhibition.

Station artist Kim Kalan at the opening night of her exhibition at the Busworks
Station artist Kim Kalan at the opening night of her exhibition at the Busworks

It’s being held around the corner from the Piccadilly Line station at the aptly named Busworks complex, the former premises of the London General Omnibus Company (LGOC) which has been converted into flexible offices, studios and workshops. As well as inviting fellow station staff – including her mother Sandra, who works in the ticket office – several of her regular customers, with whom she is extremely popular, were asked along to the preview night.

With Kim are fellow Caledonian Road station staff members Terry Rollo (left), also a customer services assistant, and her mother Sandra Lynch
With Kim are fellow Caledonian Road station staff members Terry Rollo (left), also a customer services assistant, and her mother Sandra Lynch

Called ‘Kimistic Origins – The Caledonian Road Station Artist Revealed’, the show features Kim’s very colourful and highly imaginative acrylic paintings.

Kim is also continuing to produce regular whiteboard drawings at the station to, as she says they “make the day better for my customers.”

The show runs until the end of October at The Busworks, 39 North Road, London N7 9DP and is open on weekdays from 9.30am until 5.30pm. Kim’s work can also be seen on www.kimistic.co.uk

Written by Stephen Barry, Volunteer

Station Staff Make Wood Green Open Day A Success

To add to the many special events taking place this year to mark the 150th anniversary of the London Underground, staff at Wood Green station on the Piccadilly Line organised a highly successful Open Day on Saturday, August 31.

The Open Day, the first to be held at the north London station, proved extremely popular with visitors of all ages who were taken by staff on an hourly guided tour covering both the outside and inside of the building.

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Designed by Charles Holden, Wood Green station was opened on September 19, 1932 as part of the first section of the Cockfosters extension from Finsbury Park to Arnos Grove. It is now a Grade II listed building.

After learning about the design features of the exterior facade and the spacious booking hall, visitors went down to the platforms and then into restricted areas not normally open to the public. These included a narrow maintenance tunnel which runs between the Eastbound and Westbound platforms and the machine room housing the vital escalator mechanisms.

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At the end of the tour visitors were treated to coffee and biscuits in an upstairs rest room, where staff had displayed old photographs showing the construction and development of the station. They were also given an illustrated book on the history of the Piccadilly Line extension.

The success of the Open Day was due to all the enthusiasm and hard work shown by the station staff team consisting of supervisor Ombretta Riu-Tubl and customer services assistants Nigel Buckmire and Jane Bennett. They were assisted by Steve Dagsland, supervisor at nearby Manor House station which held its Open Day – believed to be the first on the Underground network – earlier in the year.

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“We decided to hold the Open Day because we wanted to show off all parts of this historic station to our many customers who regularly use it,” said Ombretta. “The staff were very keen on the idea and on the day Nigel turned out to be a first class tour guide despite his initial nervousness.”

Following the popularity of the Wood Green and Manor House Open Days similar events may now be held at other stations along the Piccadilly Line.

Written by Stephen Barry, Volunteer

National Autistic Society Project – Carriage 353: Volunteer Perspective

NAS_ProjectGabby

Volunteers are integral to everything we do here at the Museum.  Gabby Brent is just one of many people who give up their time to assist in the running of the Museum. He is also a member of the National Autistic Society and he, along with five other members of the Society, was given the opportunity to take part in one of a number of community learning projects the Museum is undertaking to celebrate both the restoration of Metropolitan ‘Jubilee’ Carriage 353 and the Underground’s 150th anniversary.

Gabby kindly agreed to speak to me about his experience of this particular project. More information can be found here but as a brief overview Gabby and the other participants took part in a two and a half day creative learning project exploring the restored Victorian Carriage 353, and related subjects and themes, through the use of drawing, applique and embroidery techniques.  By the end, each participant ended up with a beautiful felt depiction of Carriage 353.

Participants drew up plans based on a particular theme relating to 353, and choose particular materials for their artwork. Having done all that, they had to cut and stick materials to produce their panel. Gabby’s theme was the comparison between old and new, and he produced a wonderful piece of work contrasting Carriage 353 and the new S-Stock now running on the Metropolitan Line. Gabby was understandably very proud of what he had produced.

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Asked for his favourite thing about the project, Gabby noted that he particularly liked drawing both old and new versions of Metropolitan Line trains. He enjoyed putting the drawings side by side to evaluate the ways transport has progressed over the last 150 years. He also thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to learn more about the history of the Underground, thanks to a Museum tour given by our Visitor Services Manager Michael Dipre and generally exploring around the galleries. There was also a fascinating video showing the history of Carriage 353, from a first class carriage working on the Metropolitan Railway prior to 1900, through to its use as a garden shed, and finally its restoration.

Gabby enjoyed the format of the project, having to work in teams to discuss the history of London Underground, and also debating its future. The group atmosphere was really friendly, with everyone getting on well together. A highlight was the chance to dress up in old London Transport uniforms. It was great fun, and Gabby personally learnt that the style of the hats that people wore many years ago is still the style used today!

Unlike the other participants, Gabby also volunteers at London Transport Museum. He helps with school trip bookings and craft projects, such as creating station models for London Underground. He has volunteered since 2011 but has visited since the 1990s. Museums are a great passion of his and we are very lucky to have his help here.

When asked for his general thoughts on the project, Gabby made it clear that he had really enjoyed himself. He got on well with his fellow participants, loved learning about the Underground and Carriage 353, enjoyed the dressing up, and was proud of his felt artwork. A pretty good couple of days, I’d say!

Written by William Cooper, Marketing & Development Intern

 

National Autistic Society Project – Carriage 353 Community Project

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As part of the Carriage 353 restoration and learning project, a diverse range of community activities have been taking place over the past few months. In August, the National Autistic Society (NAS) took the chance to get involved in the celebrations. Six members of the society participated in a two and a half day creative project exploring the restored Victorian Metropolitan Railway Carriage 353, and related subjects and themes, through the use of drawing, applique and embroidery techniques. London Transport Museum (LTM) was the setting for the event which was a thoroughly enjoyable couple of days for all involved.

The fun began with the screening of a fascinating film outlining the life of Carriage 353, from its use in the late nineteenth century on the Metropolitan Line, to its life as a garden shed, and finally to its recent restoration. It was then time to explore some of the themes of Victorian travel and the history of the Capital through consideration of some the Museum’s objects. For example, participants had the opportunity to get dressed up in old uniforms which helped bring our transport forebears, and their work, to life.

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Up next was an engaging tour by our Visitor Services Manager Michael Dipre. Everyone got a real feel for Victorian travel by sitting in former Metropolitan Railway carriages, an important reference point for the creative activities to be undertaken later in the day.

These activities centred on the creation of a fabric artwork depicting Carriage 353. Each participant chose a particular area of interest with regard to Carriage 353 on which to base their artwork, and created a detailed drawing, with a view to turning them into fabric pieces. Different fabrics and their textures were examined, with participants picking out suitable materials. Using fabric pens they then created an outline, before cutting out the pieces to collage together and create a fabric interpretation of their chosen theme. These then needed to be sewn together onto a calico panel.

Although everyone had some experience of sewing, a quick refresher was provided and soon they began appliqueing their fabric panels. Certainly a challenging task, the group showed impressive skills to embroider their panels.

The fabric panels display different aspects of Carriage 353 – its interior and exterior, and the contrast between the old carriages and new ones. These will be put together horizontally in a train-like fashion, with each panel resembling a carriage and will be exhibited in a touring exhibition, ending at LTM early next year.

It was certainly a thought-provoking activity and different participants had varying highlights. For Oke it was the drawing, whereas for James it was learning about the history of the carriage. For Gabby, it was the contrast between old and new that fascinated him the most.

The whole group took a great deal of care in their work, and worked extremely hard. They were rightly proud of what they had produced, and took time to admire the work of their peers. For some, the project showed them that they possessed some impressive creative skills they never believed they had!

Overall, everyone had a great time and enjoyed the chance to meet new people and get creative. The group made it clear that they can’t wait to come back together in the autumn for a tour of the Metropolitan Railway Carriage 353, when it will have returned to the LTM depot in Acton from its most recent adventures. Proud of their fabric artworks, they are also keen to bring their friends, family and colleagues to see their final pieces being exhibited both locally to the NAS, in the autumn of 2013, and at the London Transport Museum in early 2014.

Written by William Cooper, Marketing & Development Intern