All posts by London Transport Museum

Collecting for 2013 – On Broadway: A Day in the Life of Tooting Broadway

Every day, millions of us enter our local station, scan our Oyster card, head down the escalator and jump on a train to work. Other than perhaps stopping to pick up a free paper, top up our credit, or check for service updates, most of us will whiz through our stations week after week without stopping to take in what’s going on around us.

As part of the celebrations for London Underground’s 150th anniversary, film maker Geoff Marshall and I decided to spend a day at Tooting Broadway station, from gates opening to close of play, capturing the comings and goings of life at an Underground station. Arriving at 4.40am to get some shots of the station with the gates still closed, we worked six shifts throughout the day, through the morning and evening rush hour, and capturing the last train leaving the stations and the gates being locked for the night. Staff at the station were fantastic, allowing us to access all areas of the station and explaining what was happening when, ensuring we got a real insight into everything that goes on in a normal day on the Tube.

The outcome of our day is a short film, entitled ‘On Broadway: A Day in the Life of Tooting Broadway’. It’s fantastic – Geoff did a wonderful job with the filming and edit, and I merely came up with the cheesy name! The film is to be added to the Museum’s collection and may even go on display at the Museum in the future. But for now we’ll aim to get the video up on here asap so that we can share it with you all! Watch this space…

World city walk update

I arrived at the Museum bright and early this morning to join the wonderful Vicky from Design and Kath from Displayways for the installation of new text panels and graphics in our World city walk gallery. It’s always exciting to see the outcomes of projects we’ve been working on go into the main galleries. I was particularly excited about this one as it has involved contribution from the public, the Museum’s Young Consultants, along with past project participants.

The World city walk enhancements are one part of our extensive Stories of the World programme. Earlier last year we ran a number of focus groups with members of the public to explore the programme’s development. As part of this we asked participants for feedback on the World city walk gallery. Our Young Consultants also reviewed the gallery and came up with a number of ideas for enhancements. In fact, this was one of the first curatorial projects that the Young Consultants were involved in so it’s great that they’ll get to see its completion.

In terms of feedback, people agreed that the gallery was visually impressive, but wanted further information about its key messages. The Young Consultants were keen to emphasise that some of the content going into the Museum’s galleries was developed in partnership with individuals and organisations from London and beyond.

So how did we do this? The World city walk gallery invites people to explore the similarities and differences in transport modes and usage across different world cities, whilst exploring the key message that ‘transport is the lifeblood of the city’. This statement is now one of the first things that visitors will see as they enter the gallery. Along with being printed in English, it has been translated into Japanese, French, Mandarin and Hindu to reflect the languages spoken in the world cities that feature in the galleries. The Museum is very keen to maintain links with people who’ve taken part in our projects and we asked some of our contacts to assist with the translations.

Along with an introductory text panel and prints of the city names that feature, we also have a text panel explaining that some of the content featured in the galleries was co-created with the Museum’s audiences. We’re looking forward to installing a number of outcomes from engagement projects over the next few months.

                

      

  

Agnes Poitevin-Navarre – Journeys 2012 Commission

It’s all about ‘mapping’ and ‘journeys’ at the moment, people. One of the artists working with the Museum to explore these themes is the wonderful Agnes Poitevin-Navarre.

Agnes has previously created a number of artworks based on French writer Marcel Proust’s personality questionnaire, devising a series of questions to ask members of the public. For example, ‘what is your greatest achievement’ and ‘what is the most important lesson life has taught you’. Answers were collected from people of all ages and walks of life, and plotted onto maps to highlight patterns of responses related to people’s achievements and pearls of wisdom.

Earlier this year Agnes met with the Museum’s Young Volunteers, working with them on ideas for a yet to be revealed new questionnaire. The results will shape Agnes’ creation of a new map of London that reflects Londoners’ individual paths on a pedestrian, geographical or poetic dimension.

This is where you come in. Want to have your journey mapped? I’ll soon be posting details of Agnes’ questionnaire and would love to hear from you! Once again, stay tuned…

        

Want to know more about Agnes’ work?

Originally from France, Agnes moved to England to study fine art, firstly in Canterbury to do a BA and then at the Slade School of Fine Art, in London, to complete her MA.

Agnes’ art work is concerned with notions of identity, challenging perceptions of cultural, linguistic and racial categorisation. Her art practice investigates the decoding of these issues in a plurality of media [maps, prints, hair embroidery pieces, indoors and outdoors site specific installations]. The Proustian series of maps is a marvellous platform for the artist to interact with the audience. By recording their responses, she is creating historical documents that reflect the many facets of a city and the richness of individuals experiences that breathe life into it.

To find out more go to http://www.agnespnavarre.com/

     

New Artist Commissions – Journeys 2012

In one year from today London Transport Museum will open a major exhibition for 2012 that will draw on our outstanding historic map collection, exploring the theme of Journeys. Along with historic maps we’ll be displaying some fantastic newly commissioned artworks by artists such as Stephen Walter, Simon Patterson, Susan Stockwell, Jeremy Wood and Agnes Poitevin-Navarre, with more to artists to be confirmed. 

Want to be involved? A number of these projects will be shaped using public content, meaning that you’ll be able to contribute directly to the artworks. Stephen Walter, for example, is currently asking for your comments for his Subterranean Map of London.

There are some seriously exciting projects underway and we’ll be posting regularly on their development. Stay tuned…

Installing a new Poster Parade

Every few months, London Transport Museum installs a new series of 20 original posters from our collection on the first floor of the Museum. These poster parades are themed – sometimes by the season or a special event taking place, sometimes by temporary exhibitions happening elsewhere in the Museum, or sometimes to promote a project the Museum has undertaken.

Curators and museum technicians need to be in the Museum bright and early so that the installation can be completed before the doors open at 10am. This morning, a team installed 20 posters who represent some of the strongest and most iconic designs from our collection. The display showcases and celebrates our book ‘London Transport Posters: A Century of Art and Design’, which will be coming out in paperback in the coming weeks.

Information about the book can be found at our online shop: http://www.ltmuseumshop.co.uk/ltm/books/art_and_design.html

Collecting for 2013 – an introduction

In 2013 the Underground will be 150 years old. London Transport Museum is busily preparing a year long programme of events, exhibitions and heritage train runs to celebrate the anniversary. We are also embarking on a new programme of work which involves collecting contemporary material, allowing us to bring our collection up to date.

Over the next few months, I will be undertaking a number of projects with Transport for London staff and members of the public. Whenever an interesting new object or story is collected, I will be sure to blog about it here. From oral history and digital stories, to contemporary art and participatory events, it’s going to be a great year for contemporary collecting!

And I welcome any suggestions you may have about what we should be collecting that represents the Underground today!

Copyright TfL London Transport Museum

Collecting for 2013 – Windsor House display installation

As part of the Collecting for 2013 project, I am keen to know what staff who currently work for London Underground think of our collections, and for them to offer their suggestions as to what we need to collect now. Last week, my colleague Simon and I took some Underground related objects to Windsor House, a Transport for London office, and installed a new display in their reception area. Objects include a modern Oyster card holder, an old tile from St James’s Park station, and a model of the first Metropolitan line trains.

We’re asking staff to let us know what they think we should collect for this significant anniversary, and we hope these objects will offer some inspiration.

Here are a few photos of us installing the display.

HLF Stage 1 Award for Project 353

London Transport Museum has received a Stage 1 Development grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) to support the preparation of a Museum bid to the HLF for the restoration of our Metropolitan Railway ‘Jubilee’ First class carriage No.353.

The decision to restore the carriage will be announced later this summer. If all goes to plan we hope we will be able to include the restored carriage in the year-long series of exhibitions, activities and events to celebrate the anniversary – 150 Years of the London Underground

We are also supporting Quainton’s own restoration project for their Met 1 locomotive.

Exciting times ahead!

Please note that this is the full extent of information we have at the moment and therefore we’re currently unable to accept enquiries on this matter. Keep checking back for updates.

Bus Shelter Exhibition: installation


Even though the artwork only arrived on Tuesday afternoon, our fantastic MTA’s (Museum Technician Assistants) wasted no time in starting work on the installation. They spent several hours on Wedensday drilling, hanging and sticking the art panels to the wall of our temporary exhibition space, where the artwork will be shown until the 3rd June.

Today they have been working on the plasma screen, showing the films created as part of the project, which will be mounted onto the wall to complete the exhibition!

Work has already begun on planning a celebration event, where the participants of each project will be invited to the Museum to view the exhibition and meet each other for the first time.